movement

[ moov-muhnt ]
/ ˈmuv mənt /
||

noun

Origin of movement

1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French; see move, -ment
SYNONYMS FOR movement
1 See motion.
5 eventfulness.
ANTONYMS FOR movement
Related formscoun·ter·move·ment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for countermovement

  • Several times it moves eastward and collides with a countermovement from the east westward.

    War and Peace|Leo Tolstoy
  • As soon as this is widely recognized, a countermovement ought to start.

British Dictionary definitions for countermovement

movement

/ (ˈmuːvmənt) /

noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for countermovement

movement


n.

late 14c., from Old French movement "movement, exercise; start, instigation" (Modern French mouvement), from Medieval Latin movimentum, from Latin movere (see move (v.)). In the musical sense of "major division of a piece" it is attested from 1776; in the political/social sense, from 1828. Related: Movements.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for countermovement

movement

[ mōōvmənt ]

n.

The act or an instance of moving; a change in place or position.
An evacuation of the bowels; defecation.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Culture definitions for countermovement

movement


In music, a self-contained division of a long work; each movement usually has its own tempo. A long, undivided composition is said to be in one movement.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.