crunch

[kruhnch]
See more synonyms for crunch on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object)
  1. to crush with the teeth; chew with a crushing noise.
  2. to crush or grind noisily.
  3. to tighten or squeeze financially: The administration's policy seems to crunch the economy in order to combat inflation.
verb (used without object)
  1. to chew with a crushing sound.
  2. to produce, or proceed with, a crushing noise.
noun
  1. an act or sound of crunching.
  2. a shortage or reduction of something needed or wanted: the energy crunch.
  3. distress or depressed conditions due to such a shortage or reduction: a budget crunch.
  4. a critical or dangerous situation: When the crunch comes, just do your best.
Idioms
  1. crunch numbers, Computers.
    1. to perform a great many numerical calculations or extensive manipulations of numerical data.
    2. to process a large amount of data.
Also craunch.

Origin of crunch

1795–1805; blend of craunch and crush
Related formscrunch·a·ble, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for crunch numbers

load, compute, program, run, digitize, computerize, initialize, input, keyboard

British Dictionary definitions for crunch numbers

crunch

verb
  1. to bite or chew (crisp foods) with a crushing or crackling sound
  2. to make or cause to make a crisp or brittle soundthe snow crunched beneath his feet
noun
  1. the sound or act of crunching
  2. short for abdominal crunch
  3. the crunch informal the critical moment or situation
adjective
  1. informal critical; decisivecrunch time
Also called: craunch
Derived Formscrunchable, adjectivecrunchy, adjectivecrunchily, adverbcrunchiness, noun

Word Origin for crunch

C19: changed (through influence of munch) from earlier craunch, of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for crunch numbers

crunch

v.

1814, from craunch (1630s), probably of imitative origin. Related: Crunched; crunching. The noun is 1836, from the verb; the sense of "critical moment" was popularized 1939 by Winston Churchill, who had used it in his 1938 biography of Marlborough.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with crunch numbers

crunch numbers

Perform numerous calculations or process a large amount of numerical data. For example, Preparing John's presentation to the Federal Reserve Board required many hours of crunching numbers. This term originated with the computer age and indeed still applies mostly to the operations of computers. [Slang; second half of 1900s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.