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cuspidate

[ kuhs-pi-deyt ]
/ ˈkʌs pɪˌdeɪt /
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adjective

having a cusp or cusps.
furnished with or ending in a sharp and stiff point or cusp: cuspidate leaves; a cuspidate tooth.

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“Evoke” and “invoke” both derive from the same Latin root “vocāre.”

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Also cus·pi·dat·ed [kuhs-pi-dey-tid] /ˈkʌs pɪˌdeɪ tɪd/ .

Origin of cuspidate

1685–95; <New Latin cuspidātus, equivalent to Latin cuspid- (see cuspid) + -ātus-ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM cuspidate

mul·ti·cus·pi·date, adjectivemul·ti·cus·pi·dat·ed, adjectivenon·cus·pi·date, adjectivenon·cus·pi·dat·ed, adjective

Words nearby cuspidate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use cuspidate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cuspidate

cuspidate

cuspidated or cuspidal (ˈkʌspɪdəl)

/ (ˈkʌspɪˌdeɪt) /

adjective

having a cusp or cusps
(esp of leaves) narrowing to a point

Word Origin for cuspidate

C17: from Latin cuspidāre to make pointed, from cuspis a point
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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