darken

[ dahr-kuhn ]
/ ˈdɑr kən /
||

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Idioms

    darken someone's door, to come to visit; make an appearance: Never darken my door again!

Origin of darken

First recorded in 1250–1300, darken is from the Middle English word derknen. See dark, -en1

SYNONYMS FOR darken

Related forms

dark·en·er, nounun·dark·en, verb (used with object)well-dark·ened, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for darken someone's door

darken

/ (ˈdɑːkən) /

verb

to make or become dark or darker
to make or become gloomy, angry, or sadhis mood darkened
darken someone's door (usually used with a negative) to visit someonenever darken my door again!

Derived Forms

darkener, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with darken someone's door

darken someone's door

Come unwanted to someone's home, as in I told him to get out and never darken my door again. The verb darken here refers to casting one's shadow across the threshold, a word that occasionally was substituted for door. As an imperative, the expression is associated with Victorian melodrama, where someone (usually a young woman or man) is thrown out of the parental home for some misdeed, but it is actually much older. Benjamin Franklin used it in The Busybody (1729): “I am afraid she would resent it so as never to darken my doors again.”


The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.