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dink

1
[ dingk ]
/ dɪŋk /
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noun
QUIZ
SHALL WE PLAY A "SHALL" VS. "SHOULD" CHALLENGE?
Should you take this quiz on “shall” versus “should”? It should prove to be a quick challenge!
Question 1 of 6
Which form is used to state an obligation or duty someone has?

Origin of dink

1
First recorded in 1900–05; by shortening and replacement of voiced consonant [g] with voiceless [k]

Other definitions for dink (2 of 4)

dink2
[ dingk ]
/ dɪŋk /

noun Tennis, Volleyball.
a softly hit ball that falls just over the net; drop shot.

Origin of dink

2
First recorded in 1935–40; imitative, probably influenced by dinky

Other definitions for dink (3 of 4)

dink3
[ dingk ]
/ dɪŋk /

noun Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive.
a contemptuous term used to refer to a Southeast Asian, especially a Vietnamese.

Origin of dink

3
An Americanism dating back to 1965–70; compare Australian slang dink “Chinese person”; perhaps back formation from dinky, reinforced by rhyme with Chink

usage note for dink

This term was a disparaging and offensive slur applied to a Vietcong or North Vietnamese soldier during the Vietnam War.

Other definitions for dink (4 of 4)

dink4

or DINK

[ dingk ]
/ dɪŋk /

noun Informal.
either partner of a usually high-earning couple having two incomes and no children: Dinks may be able to retire early.

Origin of dink

4
First recorded in 1985–90; d(ouble) i(ncome), n(o) k(ids) or d(ual) i(ncome,) n(o) k(ids)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use dink in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for dink (1 of 2)

dink1
/ (dɪŋk) /

adjective
Scot and Northern English dialect neat or neatly dressed
verb
Australian and NZ mainly children's slang
  1. (tr) to carry (a second person) on a horse, bicycle, etc
  2. (intr) (of two people) to travel together on a horse, bicycle, etc

Word Origin for dink

C16: of unknown origin

British Dictionary definitions for dink (2 of 2)

dink2
/ (dɪŋk) sport /

noun
a ball struck delicately
verb
to hit or kick (a ball) delicately

Word Origin for dink

C20: imitative of a delicate strike
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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