disparage

[ dih-spar-ij ]
/ dɪˈspær ɪdʒ /

verb (used with object), dis·par·aged, dis·par·ag·ing.

to speak of or treat slightingly; depreciate; belittle: Do not disparage good manners.
to bring reproach or discredit upon; lower the estimation of: Your behavior will disparage the whole family.

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Origin of disparage

1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French desparag(i)er to match unequally, equivalent to des- dis-1 + -parag(i)er, derivative of parage equality, equivalent to par(er) to equalize (< Latin parāre; see peer1) + -age -age

OTHER WORDS FROM disparage

dis·par·ag·er, nounun·dis·par·aged, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for disparager

  • Cato himself, who was certainly no disparager of his own merits, says that a great many were killed, but he specifies no number.

British Dictionary definitions for disparager

disparage
/ (dɪˈspærɪdʒ) /

verb (tr)

to speak contemptuously of; belittle
to damage the reputation of

Derived forms of disparage

disparagement, noundisparager, noundisparaging, adjectivedisparagingly, adverb

Word Origin for disparage

C14: from Old French desparagier, from des- dis- 1 + parage equality, from Latin par equal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012