eliminate

[ ih-lim-uh-neyt ]
/ ɪˈlɪm əˌneɪt /

verb (used with object), e·lim·i·nat·ed, e·lim·i·nat·ing.

to remove or get rid of, especially as being in some way undesirable: to eliminate risks; to eliminate hunger.
to omit, especially as being unimportant or irrelevant; leave out: I have eliminated all statistical tables, which are of interest only to the specialist.
to remove from further consideration or competition, especially by defeating in a contest.
to eradicate or kill: to eliminate the enemy.
Physiology. to void or expel from an organism.
Mathematics. to remove (a quantity) from an equation by elimination.

Origin of eliminate

1560–70; 1915–20 for def 4; < Latin ēlīminātus turned out of doors (past participle of ēlīmināre), equivalent to ē- e-1 + līmin-, stem of līmen threshold + -ātus -ate1

Related forms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for eliminated

British Dictionary definitions for eliminated

eliminate

/ (ɪˈlɪmɪˌneɪt) /

verb (tr)

to remove or take out; get rid of
to reject as trivial or irrelevant; omit from consideration
to remove (a competitor, team, etc) from a contest, usually by defeat
slang to murder in a cold-blooded manner
physiol to expel (waste matter) from the body
maths to remove (an unknown variable) from two or more simultaneous equations

Derived Forms

Word Origin for eliminate

C16: from Latin ēlīmināre to turn out of the house, from e- out + līmen threshold

usage

Eliminate is sometimes wrongly used to talk about avoiding the repetition of something undesirable: we must prevent (not eliminate) further mistakes of this kind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012