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ensemble

[ ahn-sahm-buhl, -sahmb; French ahn-sahn-bluh ]
/ ɑnˈsɑm bəl, -ˈsɑmb; French ɑ̃ˈsɑ̃ blə /
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See synonyms for: ensemble / ensembles on Thesaurus.com

noun, plural en·sem·bles [ahn-sahm-sahm-buhlz, -sahmbz; French ahn-sahn-bluh]. /ɑnˈsɑmˈsɑm bəlz, -ˈsɑmbz; French ɑ̃ˈsɑ̃ blə/.

all the parts of a thing taken together, so that each part is considered only in relation to the whole.
the entire costume of an individual, especially when all the parts are in harmony: She was wearing a beautiful ensemble by one of the French designers.
a set of furniture.
Music.
  1. the united performance of an entire group of singers, musicians, etc.
  2. the group so performing: a string ensemble.
a group of supporting entertainers, as actors, dancers, and singers, in a theatrical production.

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Origin of ensemble

1740–50; <French: together <Latin insimul, equivalent to in-in-2 + simul together; see simultaneous
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for ensemble

ensemble
/ (ɒnˈsɒmbəl, French ɑ̃sɑ̃blə) /

noun

adverb

all together or at once

adjective

(of a film or play) involving several separate but often interrelated story linesensemble comedy drama
involving no individual star but several actors whose roles are of equal importancefine ensemble playing
C15: from French: together, from Latin insimul, from in- ² + simul at the same time
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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