excitative

[ik-sahy-tuh-tiv]
Also ex·cit·a·to·ry [ik-sahy-tuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ɪkˈsaɪ təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/.

Origin of excitative

1480–90; < Middle French excitatif < Latin excitāt- (see excitation) + -īvus -ive
Related formsnon·ex·cit·a·tive, adjectivenon·ex·cit·a·to·ry, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for excitatory

Historical Examples of excitatory

  • This intervention of an excitatory, stimulating, or liberating energy is universal.

  • According to this view the excitatory fall of the leaf is a passive, rather than an active, movement.

    Life Movements in Plants

    Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose

  • The excitatory down movement is followed by recovery on the cessation of light.

    Life Movements in Plants

    Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose

  • The excitatory movement will now be the erection of the petiole, against gravity.

    Life Movements in Plants

    Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose

  • The conduction of excitation consists, on the other hand, of propagation of excitatory protoplasmic change.

    Life Movements in Plants

    Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose