expropriate

[ eks-proh-pree-eyt ]
/ ɛksˈproʊ priˌeɪt /

verb (used with object), ex·pro·pri·at·ed, ex·pro·pri·at·ing.

to take possession of, especially for public use by the right of eminent domain, thus divesting the title of the private owner: The government expropriated the land for a recreation area.
to dispossess (a person) of ownership: The revolutionary government expropriated the landowners from their estates.
to take (something) from another's possession for one's own use: He expropriated my ideas for his own article.

Origin of expropriate

1605–15; < Medieval Latin expropriātus separated from one's own (past participle of expropriāre), equivalent to ex- ex-1 + propri(āre) to appropriate (derivative of proprius proper) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
Can be confusedappropriate apropos expropriate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for expropriation

British Dictionary definitions for expropriation

expropriate

/ (ɛksˈprəʊprɪˌeɪt) /

verb (tr)

to deprive (an owner) of (property), esp by taking it for public useSee also eminent domain
Derived Formsexpropriable, adjectiveexpropriation, nounexpropriator, noun

Word Origin for expropriate

C17: from Medieval Latin expropriāre to deprive of possessions, from proprius own
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Culture definitions for expropriation

expropriation


The taking over of private property by a government, often without fair compensation but usually with a legal assertion that the government has a right to do so.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.