falsify

[ fawl-suh-fahy ]
/ ˈfɔl sə faɪ /

verb (used with object), fal·si·fied, fal·si·fy·ing.

to make false or incorrect, especially so as to deceive: to falsify income-tax reports.
to alter fraudulently.
to represent falsely: He falsified the history of his family to conceal his humble origins.
to show or prove to be false; disprove: to falsify a theory.

verb (used without object), fal·si·fied, fal·si·fy·ing.

to make false statements.

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Origin of falsify

1400–50; late Middle English falsifien < Middle French falsifier < Late Latin falsificāre. See false, -ify

SYNONYMS FOR falsify

1, 3 See misrepresent.
4 rebut, discredit, refute, confute, controvert.

OTHER WORDS FROM falsify

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for falsified

British Dictionary definitions for falsified

falsify
/ (ˈfɔːlsɪˌfaɪ) /

verb -fies, -fying or -fied (tr)

to make (a report, evidence, accounts, etc) false or inaccurate by alteration, esp in order to deceive
to prove false; disprove

Derived forms of falsify

falsifiable, adjectivefalsification (ˌfɔːlsɪfɪˈkeɪʃən), nounfalsifier, noun

Word Origin for falsify

C15: from Old French falsifier, from Late Latin falsificāre, from Latin falsus false + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012