deceive

[ dih-seev ]
/ dɪˈsiv /

verb (used with object), de·ceived, de·ceiv·ing.

to mislead by a false appearance or statement; delude: They deceived the enemy by disguising the destroyer as a freighter.
to be unfaithful to (one's spouse or lover).
Archaic. to while away (time).

verb (used without object), de·ceived, de·ceiv·ing.

to mislead or falsely persuade others; practice deceit: an engaging manner that easily deceives.

Origin of deceive

1250–1300; Middle English deceiven < Old French deceivre < Latin dēcipere, literally, to ensnare, equivalent to dē- de- + -cipere, combining form of capere to take

Related forms

Synonym study

1. See cheat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for deceive

British Dictionary definitions for deceive

deceive

/ (dɪˈsiːv) /

verb (tr)

to mislead by deliberate misrepresentation or lies
to delude (oneself)
to be unfaithful to (one's sexual partner)
archaic to disappointhis hopes were deceived

Derived Forms

Word Origin for deceive

C13: from Old French deceivre, from Latin dēcipere to ensnare, cheat, from capere to take
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012