farrow

1
[ far-oh ]
/ ˈfær oʊ /
|

noun

a litter of pigs.

verb (used with object)

(of swine) to bring forth (young).

verb (used without object)

to produce a litter of pigs.

Nearby words

  1. farrell, suzanne,
  2. farrest,
  3. farrier,
  4. farriery,
  5. farro,
  6. farruca,
  7. fars,
  8. farseeing,
  9. farsi,
  10. farsighted

Origin of farrow

1
before 900; Middle English farwen to give birth to a litter of pigs, derivative of Old English fearh pig (cognate with Latin porcus); akin to German Ferkel young pig

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for farrowing

  • The brood sows are placed in separate pens at farrowing time and watched carefully when giving birth to the pigs.

  • In ordinary cases this is not necessary, the farrowing of a litter of pigs is a simple and natural operation.

    The Pig|Sanders Spencer
  • One of the chief causes of trouble with the farrowing sow arises from the sow not having been allowed to take sufficient exercise.

    The Pig|Sanders Spencer


British Dictionary definitions for farrowing

farrow

1
/ (ˈfærəʊ) /

noun

a litter of piglets

verb

(of a sow) to give birth to (a litter)

Word Origin for farrow

Old English fearh; related to Old High German farah young pig, Latin porcus pig, Greek porkos

farrow

2
/ (ˈfærəʊ) /

adjective

(of a cow) not calving in a given year

Word Origin for farrow

C15: from Middle Dutch verwe- (unattested) cow that has ceased to bear; compare Old English fearr ox

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for farrowing

farrow

n.

Old English fearh "young pig," from Proto-Germanic *farkhaz "young pig" (cf. Middle Low German ferken, Dutch varken, both diminutives, Old High German farh, German Ferkel), from PIE *porkos- (see pork (n.)). Sense of "a litter of pigs" first recorded 1570s. As a verb, early 13c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper