feaze

1
[feez]
|

verb (used with object), feazed, feaz·ing. Nautical.

to untwist (the end of a rope).

Nearby words

  1. feature story,
  2. feature-length,
  3. featured,
  4. featureless,
  5. features,
  6. feazing,
  7. feb,
  8. feb.,
  9. febri,
  10. febri-

Origin of feaze

1
1560–70; akin to Dutch vezelen to fray, Middle Dutch veze frayed edge, Old English fæs fringe

feaze

2
[feez, feyz]

noun

feeze

or feaze

[feez, feyz]

noun Dialect.

a state of vexation or worry.
a violent rush or impact.

Origin of feeze

1350–1400; Middle English fese blast, rush, fesen to drive, chase, frighten; compare Old English (Anglian) fēsan, (West Saxon) fȳsan

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for feaze

  • But it's only fair to warn you that it may turn up some things that'll feaze you.

    The Price|Francis Lynde
  • Her opinion of him, however, did not feaze Harris in the least.

  • She gets them, any way, and they don't seem to feaze her a particle.

    Peggy Stewart at School|Gabrielle E. Jackson


British Dictionary definitions for feaze

feaze

1

verb

nautical to make or become unravelled or frayed

Word Origin for feaze

C16: perhaps from obsolete Dutch vese fringe, from Middle Dutch vese, veze fringe; related to Old English fæs

verb, noun

a variant of feeze, faze

feeze

feaze

dialect

verb

(tr) to beat
to drive off
mainly US to disconcert; worry

noun

a rush
mainly US a state of agitation

Word Origin for feeze

Old English fēsian

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012