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View synonyms for supersede

supersede

[ soo-per-seed ]

verb (used with object)

, su·per·sed·ed, su·per·sed·ing.
  1. to replace in power, authority, effectiveness, acceptance, use, etc., as by another person or thing.
  2. to set aside or cause to be set aside as void, useless, irrelevant, or obsolete, usually in consideration of something mentioned:

    The success of the vaccine superseded the necessity of a smallpox hospital, and the enterprise was abandoned almost as soon as conceived.

    Synonyms: rescind, revoke, annul, overrule, void

  3. to succeed to the position, function, office, etc., of; supplant.


supersede

/ ˌsuːpəˈsiːdʒə; ˌsuːpəˈsiːd; ˌsuːpəˈsɛʃən /

verb

  1. to take the place of (something old-fashioned or less appropriate); supplant
  2. to replace in function, office, etc; succeed
  3. to discard or set aside or cause to be set aside as obsolete or inferior


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Derived Forms

  • ˌsuperˈseder, noun
  • supersedure, noun
  • ˌsuperˈsedence, noun
  • supersession, noun
  • ˌsuperˈsedable, adjective
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Other Words From

  • su·per·sed·a·ble adjective
  • su·per·sed·er noun
  • un·su·per·sed·ing adjective
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Word History and Origins

Origin of supersede1

First recorded in 1485–95; from Latin supersedēre “to sit above or upon, forbear,” equivalent to super- super- + sedēre “to sit”; sit 1
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Word History and Origins

Origin of supersede1

C15: via Old French from Latin supersedēre to sit above, from super- + sedēre to sit
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Synonym Study

See replace.
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Example Sentences

The trial in Brooklyn federal court was delayed due to the pandemic, as well as the superseding charges that Illinois and New York prosecutors each filed in February and March of last year, respectively.

So perhaps it is no surprise that the screen fathers of the current era find themselves, like they might have in the delivery ward, at a bit of a loss as to how to be useful, and perhaps even superseded in importance by their offspring.

From Time

That regularity had many possible meanings and was difficult to interpret, at times I thought it was the expression of an intrinsic ease between us, some deep familiarity superseding our many differences.

As discussed, a gold standard copy will not supersede poor website design.

In December of that year, law enforcement superseded that indictment with additional charges.

They would not, for example, supersede federal law regarding the Establishment Clause in the First Amendment.

Sport does have this incredible power to supersede current affairs and politics.

Netanyahu is meanwhile scrambling to supersede the Plessner committee with intra-coalition negotiations conducted by himself.

A view of the duchess's ball-room, or of the dining-table of the earl, will supersede all occasion for lengthy fiddle-faddle.

There is to be no sovereign power, great or small, other than American, and tribal wards are to supersede dattoships.

By the act, which it was intended to supersede, all foreign sugar was subjected to a duty of 63s.

Led astray by party spirit, the ministers sent Admiral Pigot, a mere nonentity, to supersede Rodney.

It is destined to supersede the one, and to introduce the other.

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