fifth-wheel trailer

[ fifth-hweel, -weel or, often, fith- ]
/ ˈfɪfθˌʰwil, -ˌwil or, often, ˈfɪθ- /

noun

Definition for fifth-wheel trailer (2 of 2)

fifth wheel

noun

a horizontal ring or segment of a ring, consisting of two bands that slide on each other, placed above the front axle of a carriage and designed to support the forepart of the body while allowing it to turn freely in a horizontal plane.
a similar device used as a coupling to connect a semitrailer to a tractor.
a similar coupling between a heavy-duty pickup truck and a camping trailer (fifth-wheel trailer) that extends over the bed of the truck.
an extra wheel for a four-wheeled vehicle.
a superfluous, unneeded, or unwanted person or thing: They enjoy making any outsider feel like a fifth wheel.

Origin of fifth wheel

First recorded in 1870–75
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for fifth-wheel trailer

fifth wheel

noun

a spare wheel for a four-wheeled vehicle
  1. the coupling table of an articulated vehicle
  2. a steering bearing that enables the front axle of a horse-drawn vehicle to rotate relative to the body
a superfluous or unnecessary person or thing

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Culture definitions for fifth-wheel trailer

fifth wheel

A hanger-on; a person who serves no function: “The vice president felt like a fifth wheel after his exclusion from the committee.”


The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with fifth-wheel trailer

fifth wheel

An extra and unnecessary person or thing, as in He was the only one without a date, so he felt like a fifth wheel. This expression, which alludes to an unneeded wheel on a four-wheel vehicle, may have originated as long ago as 1631, when Thomas Dekker wrote Match Me in London: “Thou tiest but wings to a swift gray Hounds heel, And addest to a running Chariot a fifth wheel.”


The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.