Francis

[fran-sis]

francize

[fran-sahyz]
verb (used with object), fran·cized, fran·ciz·ing. Canadian.
  1. to force to adopt French customs and the French language.
Also especially British, fran·cise.

Origin of francize

Related formsfran·ci·za·tion, nounfran·ciz·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for francises

Historical Examples of francises


British Dictionary definitions for francises

Francis

noun
  1. Dick, full name Richard Stanley Francis . 1920–2010, British thriller writer, formerly a champion jockey. His books include Dead Cert (1962), The Edge (1988), and Come to Grief (1995)
  2. Sir Philip . 1740–1818, British politician; probable author of the Letters of Junius (1769–72). He played an important part in the impeachment of Warren Hastings (1788–95)

francize

francise

verb
  1. Canadian to make or become French-speaking
Derived Formsfrancization or francisation, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for francises

Francis

masc. proper name, from French François, from Old French Franceis, from Late Latin Franciscus, literally "Frankish;" cognate with French and frank.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper