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from this day forward

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Also, from this day on; from now on. Beginning today and continuing forever, as in They promised to follow instructions from this day forward, or From now on I'll do what you say. The first rather formal expression for this concept dates from about 1500. The second was used in the past tense by Thomas Hobbes in Odyssey (1675): “From that day on, centaurs and men are foes.” The last version is the most common today.

QUIZ
QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!
Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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