Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

froward

[froh-werd, froh-erd]
See more synonyms for froward on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. willfully contrary; not easily managed: to be worried about one's froward, intractable child.
Show More

Origin of froward

First recorded in 1150–1200, froward is from the Middle English word froward, fraward. See fro, -ward
Related formsfro·ward·ly, adverbfro·ward·ness, nounun·fro·ward, adjectiveun·fro·ward·ly, adverb
Can be confusedforeword forward forwards froward

Synonyms

See more synonyms for froward on Thesaurus.com
obstinate, willful, disobedient, fractious, wayward, unmanageable, difficult.

Antonyms

docile, tractable.

Froward

[froh-werd, froh-erd]
noun
  1. Cape, a cape in S Chile, on the Strait of Magellan: southernmost point of mainland South America.
Show More
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for froward

Historical Examples

  • You permit your heart (little did I think it was such a froward one) to recoil.

    Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9)

    Samuel Richardson

  • Another trouble is occasioned by the froward behavior of flowers.

  • "Speak on," said Hilda, calmly, as a nurse to a froward child.

    Harold, Complete

    Edward Bulwer-Lytton

  • Who is this froward youth, with his loud and boisterous voice?

  • But be not froward because of a first success, nor hope too much from a royal smile.

    Sea-Dogs All!

    Tom Bevan


British Dictionary definitions for froward

froward

adjective
  1. archaic obstinate; contrary
Show More
Derived Formsfrowardly, adverbfrowardness, noun

Word Origin

C14: see fro, -ward
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for froward

adv.

Old English fromweard "turned from or away," from from + -weard (see -ward). Opposite of toward, it renders Latin pervertus in early translations of the Psalms, and also meant "about to depart, departing," and "doomed to die." Related: Frowardly; frowardness.

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper