fudge

1
[ fuhj ]
/ fʌdʒ /

noun

a soft candy made of sugar, butter, milk, chocolate, and sometimes nuts.

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Origin of fudge

1
1895–1900, Americanism; of uncertain origin; the word was early in its history associated with college campuses, where fudge-making was popular; however, attempts to explain it as a derivative of fudge3 (preparing the candy supposedly being an excuse to “fudge” on dormitory rules) are dubious and probably after-the-fact speculation

Definition for fudge (2 of 3)

fudge2
[ fuhj ]
/ fʌdʒ /

noun

nonsense or foolishness (often used as an interjection).

verb (used without object), fudged, fudg·ing.

to talk nonsense.

Origin of fudge

2
1690–1700; origin uncertain; cf. fudge3

Definition for fudge (3 of 3)

fudge3
[ fuhj ]
/ fʌdʒ /

verb (used without object), fudged, fudg·ing.

to cheat or welsh (often followed by on): to fudge on an exam; to fudge on one's campaign promises.
to avoid coming to grips with something: to fudge on an issue.
to exaggerate a cost, estimate, etc., in order to allow leeway for error.

verb (used with object), fudged, fudg·ing.

to avoid coming to grips with (a subject, issue, etc.); evade; dodge: to fudge a direct question.

noun

Origin of fudge

3
1665–75; origin uncertain; in earliest sense, “to contrive clumsily,” perhaps expressive variant of fadge to fit, agree, do (akin to Middle English feien to put together, join, Old English fēgan); unclear if fudge1 and fudge2 are developments of this word or independent coinages
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for fudge

British Dictionary definitions for fudge (1 of 3)

fudge1
/ (fʌdʒ) /

noun

a soft variously flavoured sweet made from sugar, butter, cream, etc

Word Origin for fudge

C19: of unknown origin

British Dictionary definitions for fudge (2 of 3)

fudge2
/ (fʌdʒ) /

noun

foolishness; nonsense

interjection

a mild exclamation of annoyance

verb

(intr) to talk foolishly or emptily

Word Origin for fudge

C18: of uncertain origin

British Dictionary definitions for fudge (3 of 3)

fudge3
/ (fʌdʒ) /

noun

verb

Word Origin for fudge

C19: see fadge
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012