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gateway

[ geyt-wey ]
/ ˈgeɪtˌweɪ /
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noun
an entrance or passage that may be closed by a gate.
a structure for enclosing such an opening or entrance.
any passage by or point at which a region may be entered: New York soon became the gateway to America.
Digital Technology.
  1. software or hardware that connects two disparate computer networks, as to enable the passage of information between a home or business network and the internet.
  2. software that facilitates digital communication of text messages over cellular telephone networks.
adjective
relating to or noting an ingested substance, habit, activity, etc., that is relatively free of bad effects but may lead to more dangerous or extreme choices: sweet gateway drinks that mask the taste of alcohol;gateway gadgets that seem simple enough, but tempt you to buy expensive accessories.
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Origin of gateway

First recorded in 1700–10; gate1 + way1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use gateway in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for gateway

gateway
/ (ˈɡeɪtˌweɪ) /

noun
an entrance that may be closed by or as by a gate
a means of entry or accessMumbai, gateway to India
(modifier) allowing entry, access, or progress to a more extreme formgateway drug; gateway drink
computing hardware and software that connect incompatible computer networks, allowing information to be passed from one to another
a software utility that enables text messages to be sent and received over digital cellular telephone networks
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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