girt

1
[gurt]
See more synonyms for girt on Thesaurus.com

girt

2
[gurt]
verb (used with object)
  1. gird1(def 1).

girt

3
[gurt]
noun, verb (used with object)
  1. girth.

girt

4
[gurt]
noun
  1. Carpentry.
    1. a timber or plate connecting the corner posts of an exterior wooden frame, as a braced frame, at a floor above the ground floor.
    2. a heavy beam, as for supporting the ends of rafters.
  2. Printing. (in certain hand presses) one of a pair of leather straps having one end fastened to the bed and the other to the rounce, for drawing the bed under the platen.

Origin of girt

4
First recorded in 1555–65; alteration of girth

gird

1
[gurd]
verb (used with object), gird·ed or girt, gird·ing.
  1. to encircle or bind with a belt or band.
  2. to surround; enclose; hem in.
  3. to prepare (oneself) for action: He girded himself for the trial ahead.
  4. to provide, equip, or invest, as with power or strength.

Origin of gird

1
before 950; Middle English girden, Old English gyrdan; cognate with German gürten
Related formsgird·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms for gird

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gird

2
[gurd]
verb (used without object)
  1. to gibe; jeer (usually followed by at).
verb (used with object)
  1. to gibe or jeer at; taunt.
noun
  1. a gibe.

Origin of gird

2
1175–1225; Middle English gyrd a stroke, blow, hence a cutting remark, derivative of girden to strike, smite < ?
Related formsgird·ing·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for girt

Historical Examples of girt

  • Then girt him Beowulf in martial mail, nor mourned for his life.

    Beowulf

    Anonymous

  • I's only a laal man, but I's got a girt appetite, thoo sees.

    A Son of Hagar

    Sir Hall Caine

  • Nobody could doubt that he had wandered in Siberian forests, naked and girt with a chain.

    Under Western Eyes

    Joseph Conrad

  • Then he prepared himself to go, and girt on his sword, talking earnestly the while.

    In Kings' Byways

    Stanley J. Weyman

  • Your hand has girt it round about with cliffs and peopled it with a peaceful race.

    Manasseh

    Maurus Jokai


British Dictionary definitions for girt

girt

1
verb
  1. a past tense and past participle of gird 1
adjective
  1. nautical moored securely to prevent swinging

girt

2
verb
  1. (tr) to bind or encircle; gird
  2. to measure the girth of (something)

gird

1
verb girds, girding, girded or girt (tr)
  1. to put a belt, girdle, etc, around (the waist or hips)
  2. to bind or secure with or as if with a beltto gird on one's armour
  3. to surround; encircle
  4. to prepare (oneself) for action (esp in the phrase gird (up) one's loins)
  5. to endow with a rank, attribute, etc, esp knighthood

Word Origin for gird

Old English gyrdan, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse gyrtha, Old High German gurten

gird

2
verb
  1. (when intr, foll by at) to jeer (at someone); mock
  2. (tr) to strike (a blow at someone)
  3. (intr) to move at high speed
noun
    1. a blow or stroke
    2. a taunt; gibe
  1. a display of bad temper or anger (esp in the phrases in a gird; throw a gird)

Word Origin for gird

C13 girden to strike, cut, of unknown origin

gird

3
noun
  1. Scot a hoop, esp a child's hoopAlso: girr

Word Origin for gird

a Scot variant of girth
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for girt
v.

c.1400 as alternative form of gird; also past tense and past participle of gird.

gird

v.

Old English gyrdan "put a belt or girdle around; encircle, surround; invest with attributes," from Proto-Germanic *gurthjanan (cf. Old Norse gyrða, Old Saxon gurdian, Old Frisian gerda, Dutch gorden, Old High German gurtan, German gürten). Related to Old English geard "hedge, enclosure" (see yard (n.1)). Related: Girded; girding.

Throughout its whole history the English word is chiefly employed in rhetorical language, in many instances with more or less direct allusion to biblical passages. [OED]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper