gladius

[ gley-dee-uhs ]
/ ˈgleɪ di əs /

noun, plural gla·di·i [gley-dee-ahy]. /ˈgleɪ diˌaɪ/.

a short sword used in ancient Rome by legionaries.

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Origin of gladius

Borrowed into English from Latin around 1510–20
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for gladius

  • The European species, common in the Mediterranean, is the Xiphias gladius of naturalists.

    The Sailor's Word-Book|William Henry Smyth
  • I'll take that sword there—no scabbard—and two daggers, besides my gladius.

    Triplanetary|Edward Elmer Smith