going-over

[ goh-ing-oh-ver ]
/ ˈgoʊ ɪŋˈoʊ vər /

noun, plural go·ings-o·ver [goh-ingz-oh-ver]. /ˈgoʊ ɪŋzˈoʊ vər/.

a review, examination, or investigation: The accounts were given a thorough going-over.
a severe, thorough scolding.
a sound thrashing; beating: The hoodlums gave him a good going-over when they found him.

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Origin of going-over

1870–75, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase go over
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for going-over

  • What is great in man is that he is a bridge, and no goal; what can be loved in man is that he is a going-over and a going-under.

    Plain English|Marian Wharton
  • I'll stop by in the morning, when he's awake, and give him a going-over.

    Feet Of Clay|Phillip Hoskins
  • He was a mass of cuts and bruises, and he knew they must have given him quite a going-over.

    The Happy Unfortunate|Robert Silverberg
  • At the second going-over in her presence the topic was better shaken down, was in a more solidified form for her notebook.

British Dictionary definitions for going-over

going-over

noun plural goings-over informal

a check, examination, or investigation
a castigation or thrashing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012