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grumble

[ gruhm-buhl ]
/ ˈgrʌm bəl /
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See synonyms for: grumble / grumbled / grumbling / grumbler on Thesaurus.com

verb (used without object), grum·bled, grum·bling.
to murmur or mutter in discontent; complain sullenly: Tim always found something to grumble about.
to utter low, indistinct sounds; growl: Suddenly I heard my stomach grumble, and realized I hadn't had any lunch.
to rumble: The thunder grumbled in the west.
verb (used with object), grum·bled, grum·bling.
to express or utter with murmuring or complaining.
noun
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Origin of grumble

First recorded in 1580–90; perhaps frequentative of Old English grymman “to wail”; compare Dutch grommelen, German grummeln, French grommeler (from Germanic )

synonym study for grumble

1. See complain.

OTHER WORDS FROM grumble

grumbler, noungrum·bling·ly, adverbgrumbly, adjectiveun·grum·bling, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use grumble in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for grumble

grumble
/ (ˈɡrʌmbəl) /

verb
to utter (complaints) in a nagging or discontented way
(intr) to make low dull rumbling sounds
noun
a complaint; grouse
a low rumbling sound

Derived forms of grumble

grumbler, noungrumblingly, adverbgrumbly, adjective

Word Origin for grumble

C16: from Middle Low German grommelen, of Germanic origin; see grim
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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