haggard

[ hag-erd ]
/ ˈhæg ərd /

adjective

having a gaunt, wasted, or exhausted appearance, as from prolonged suffering, exertion, or anxiety; worn: the haggard faces of the tired troops.
wild; wild-looking: haggard eyes.
Falconry. (especially of a hawk caught after it has attained adult plumage) untamed.

noun

Falconry. a wild or untamed hawk caught after it has assumed adult plumage.

Origin of haggard

1560–70; orig., wild female hawk. See hag1, -ard

Related forms

hag·gard·ly, adverbhag·gard·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for haggardness

British Dictionary definitions for haggardness (1 of 3)

Haggard

/ (ˈhæɡəd) /

noun

Sir (Henry) Rider . 1856–1925, British author of romantic adventure stories, including King Solomon's Mines (1885)

British Dictionary definitions for haggardness (2 of 3)

haggard

1
/ (ˈhæɡəd) /

adjective

careworn or gaunt, as from lack of sleep, anxiety, or starvation
wild or unruly
(of a hawk) having reached maturity in the wild before being caught

noun

falconry a hawk that has reached maturity before being caughtCompare eyas, passage hawk

Derived Forms

haggardly, adverbhaggardness, noun

Word Origin for haggard

C16: from Old French hagard wild; perhaps related to hedge

British Dictionary definitions for haggardness (3 of 3)

haggard

2
/ (ˈhæɡərd) /

noun

(in Ireland and the Isle of Man) an enclosure beside a farmhouse in which crops are stored

Word Origin for haggard

C16: related to Old Norse heygarthr, from hey hay + garthr yard
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012