Hawks

[ hawks ]
/ hɔks /
|

noun

Howard (Winchester),1896–1977, U.S. film director.

Nearby words

  1. hawash,
  2. hawes water,
  3. hawfinch,
  4. hawg,
  5. hawick,
  6. hawk moth,
  7. hawk owl,
  8. hawk's beard,
  9. hawk's-beard,
  10. hawk's-eye

hawk

1
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

noun

verb (used without object)

to fly, or hunt on the wing, like a hawk.
to hunt with hawks.

Origin of hawk

1
before 900; Middle English hauk(e), Old English hafoc; cognate with Old Frisian havek, Old Saxon habuc Old High German habuh, Old Norse haukr hawk, perhaps Polish kobuz kind of falcon

Related formshawk·like, adjective

hawk

2
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

verb (used with object)

to peddle or offer for sale by calling aloud in public.
to advertise or offer for sale: to hawk soap on television.
to spread (rumors, news, etc.).

verb (used without object)

to carry wares about for sale; peddle.

Origin of hawk

2
First recorded in 1470–80; back formation from hawker2

hawk

3
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

verb (used without object)

to make an effort to raise phlegm from the throat; clear the throat noisily.

verb (used with object)

to raise by noisily clearing the throat: to hawk phlegm up.

noun

a noisy effort to clear the throat.

Origin of hawk

3
1575–85; imitative; see haw1

hawk

4
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

noun

a small, square board with a handle underneath it, used by plasterers and masons to hold plaster or mortar being applied.

Origin of hawk

4
1350–1400; Middle English; perhaps variant of hache battle-ax (see hatchet)

Hawk

[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

noun Military.

a medium-range, mobile U.S. surface-to-air missile system.

Origin of Hawk

H(oming) A(ll the) W(ay) K(iller)

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hawks


British Dictionary definitions for hawks

Hawks

/ (hɔːks) /

noun

Howard (Winchester). 1896–1977, US film director. His films include Sergeant York (1941) and The Big Sleep (1946)

hawk

1
/ (hɔːk) /

noun

verb

Derived Formshawklike, adjective

Word Origin for hawk

from Shakespeare (Hamlet II:2:375); handsaw is probably a corruption of dialect heronshaw heron Old English hafoc; related to Old Norse haukr, Old Frisian havek, Old High German habuh, Polish kobuz

hawk

2
/ (hɔːk) /

verb

to offer (goods) for sale, as in the street
(tr often foll by about) to spread (news, gossip, etc)

Word Origin for hawk

C16: back formation from hawker 1

hawk

3
/ (hɔːk) /

verb

(intr) to clear the throat noisily
(tr) to force (phlegm) up from the throat
British a slang word for spit 1

noun

a noisy clearing of the throat

Word Origin for hawk

C16: of imitative origin; see haw ²

hawk

4
/ (hɔːk) /

noun

a small square board with a handle underneath, used for carrying wet plaster or mortarAlso called: mortar board

Word Origin for hawk

of unknown origin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hawks
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with hawks

hawk

see watch like a hawk.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.