hearsay

[heer-sey]
noun
  1. unverified, unofficial information gained or acquired from another and not part of one's direct knowledge: I pay no attention to hearsay.
  2. an item of idle or unverified information or gossip; rumor: a malicious hearsay.
adjective
  1. of, relating to, or characterized by hearsay: hearsay knowledge; a hearsay report.

Origin of hearsay

1525–35; orig. in phrase by hear say, translation of Middle French par ouïr dire

Synonyms for hearsay

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for hearsays

Historical Examples of hearsays


British Dictionary definitions for hearsays

hearsay

noun
  1. gossip; rumour
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hearsays

hearsay

n.

1530s, perhaps mid-15c., from phrase to hear say.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

hearsays in Culture

hearsay

Information heard by one person about another. Hearsay is generally inadmissible as evidence in a court of law because it is based on the reports of others rather than on the personal knowledge of a witness.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.