hereabout

or here·a·bouts

[heer-uh-bout]

adverb

about this place; in this neighborhood.

Origin of hereabout

Middle English word dating back to 1175–1225; see origin at here, about
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hereabouts

Historical Examples of hereabouts

  • Ye're as good as any hereabouts, and no call to hang your head.

    Indian and Scout

    F. S. Brereton

  • By this time no one will be watching for me hereabouts, as I am supposed to be in London.

    The Pagan's Cup

    Fergus Hume

  • Hereabouts are a few waterfalls, were it not for which the river would be navigable from its mouth to its source.

  • We stopped before a great oak; a beech tree was behind us—she said, ‘Dig, Lionel, hereabouts.’

    The World of Romance

    William Morris

  • Formans place is as good as any hereabouts, and its clear, and only three children to be divided among.



British Dictionary definitions for hereabouts

hereabouts

hereabout

adverb

in this region or neighbourhood; near this place
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hereabouts

hereabout

"about this, with regard to this matter," c.1200, from here + about. Meaning "in the vicinity, near here" is from early 13c. Hereabouts is from 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper