Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

holy of holies

See more synonyms for holy of holies on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. a place of special sacredness.
  2. the innermost chamber of the Biblical tabernacle and the Temple in Jerusalem, in which the ark of the covenant was kept.
  3. Eastern Church. the bema.
Show More

Origin of holy of holies

1350–1400; Middle English, translation of Late Latin sanctum sanctōrum (Vulgate), translation of Greek tò hágion tôn hagíōn, itself translation of Hebrew qōdesh haqqodāshīm
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for holy of holies

Historical Examples

  • If you know your business, you are struck with awe on being in this holy-of-holies.

    The Church of St. Bunco

    Gordon Clark

  • Englishmen had been to Lhassa and to Tashi-lunpo; therefore, both of their holy-of-holies had been profaned.

    Caravans By Night

    Harry Hervey

  • Only a chosen few had ever set foot within the holy-of-holies; this young man was not one of them.

    Warrior of the Dawn

    Howard Carleton Browne

  • I made no reply, for I feared that she would live to regret having created that scene in the monk's holy-of-holies.

    The Minister of Evil

    William Le Queux


British Dictionary definitions for holy of holies

holy of holies

noun
  1. any place of special sanctity
  2. (capitals) the innermost compartment of the Jewish tabernacle, and later of the Temple, where the Ark was enshrined
Show More
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with holy of holies

holy of holies

A place of awe or sacredness, as in The corporate board room is the holy of holies here. This expression is a translation of the Hebrew term for the sanctuary inside the tabernacle of the Temple of Jerusalem, where the sacred Ark of the Covenant was kept (Exodus 26:34). Its figurative use dates from the second half of the 1800s.

Show More
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.