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ideal gas

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noun Physics.
a gas composed of molecules on which no forces act except upon collision with one another and with the walls of the container in which the gas is enclosed; a gas that obeys the ideal gas law.
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Also called perfect gas.

Origin of ideal gas

First recorded in 1890–95
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use ideal gas in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for ideal gas

ideal gas

noun
a hypothetical gas which obeys Boyle's law exactly at all temperatures and pressures, and which has internal energy that depends only upon the temperature. Measurements upon real gases are extrapolated to zero pressure to obtain results in agreement with theories relating to an ideal gas, especially in thermometryAlso called: perfect gas
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for ideal gas

ideal gas

n.
A gas that, when kept at a constant temperature, would obey gas laws exactly. No known gas is an ideal gas.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for ideal gas

ideal gas
[ ī-dēəl ]

A hypothetical gas whose molecules bounce off each other (and the boundaries of their container) with perfect elasticity and have negligible size, and in which the intermolecular forces acting between molecules not in contact with each other are also negligible. Such a gas would obey the gas laws (such as Charles's law and Boyle's law) exactly at all temperatures and pressures. Most actual gases behave approximately as ideal gases, except at very low temperatures (when the potential energy of their intermolecular forces is high relative to the kinetic energy of the molecules and becomes significant), and under very high pressures (when the molecules are packed so close together that close-range intermolecular forces become significant).
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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