ideate

[ verb ahy-dee-eyt, ahy-dee-eyt; noun ahy-dee-eyt, ahy-dee-it ]
/ verb ˈaɪ diˌeɪt, aɪˈdi eɪt; noun ˈaɪ diˌeɪt, aɪˈdi ɪt /

verb (used with object), i·de·at·ed, i·de·at·ing.

to form an idea, thought, or image of.

verb (used without object), i·de·at·ed, i·de·at·ing.

to form ideas; think.

noun

QUIZZES

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seclusion

Origin of ideate

First recorded in 1600–10; ide(a) + -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM ideate

i·de·a·tive [ahy-dee-uh-tiv, ahy-dee-ey-], /aɪˈdi ə tɪv, ˈaɪ diˌeɪ-/, adjectiveun·i·de·at·ed, adjectiveun·i·de·at·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for ideate

  • That premise works both ways, dear lady, Jrann-Pttt ideated.

    Collector's Item|Evelyn E. Smith
  • Its appeal is to our freedom, and the duty is ideated before it is performed.

    Theoretical Ethics|Milton Valentine
  • He saw she had the capacity for deep and excited interest in truth, an emotional love for ideated experience.

    An Anarchist Woman|Hutchins Hapgood
  • And occasionally the one ideated object was felt to exert an influence over the other.

British Dictionary definitions for ideate

ideate
/ (ˈaɪdɪˌeɪt) /

verb

(tr) to form or have an idea of; to imagine or conceive

Derived forms of ideate

ideation, noun

Word Origin for ideate

C17: from Medieval Latin ideat- formed as an idea, from ideare, from Greek idea model, pattern, notion
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012