ignore

[ ig-nawr, -nohr ]
/ ɪgˈnɔr, -ˈnoʊr /

verb (used with object), ig·nored, ig·nor·ing.

to refrain from noticing or recognizing: to ignore insulting remarks.
Law. (of a grand jury) to reject (a bill of indictment), as on the grounds of insufficient evidence.

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Origin of ignore

1605–15; < Latin ignōrāre to not know, disregard, verbal derivative of ignārus ignorant, unaware (with -ō- perhaps from ignōtus unknown), equivalent to in- in-3 + gnārus knowing, acquainted (with); akin to (g)nōscere to know1

OTHER WORDS FROM ignore

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for ignorable

  • Things-plus-me is the only knowable, and consequently the only 'ignorable.'

    James Frederick Ferrier|Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane
  • The law of ignorance hence is that 'we can be ignorant only of what can be known,' or 'the knowable is alone the ignorable.'

    James Frederick Ferrier|Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane

British Dictionary definitions for ignorable

ignore
/ (ɪɡˈnɔː) /

verb (tr)

to fail or refuse to notice; disregard

noun

Australian informal disregardto treat someone with ignore

Derived forms of ignore

ignorable, adjectiveignorer, noun

Word Origin for ignore

C17: from Latin ignōrāre not to know, from ignārus ignorant of, from i- in- 1 + gnārus knowing; related to Latin noscere to know
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012