immure

[ih-myoo r]
See more synonyms for immure on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object), im·mured, im·mur·ing.
  1. to enclose within walls.
  2. to shut in; seclude or confine.
  3. to imprison.
  4. to build into or entomb in a wall.
  5. Obsolete. to surround with walls; fortify.

Origin of immure

1575–85; < Medieval Latin immūrāre, equivalent to Latin im- im-1 + -mūrāre, verbal derivative of mūrus wall (cf. mural)
Related formsim·mure·ment, im·mu·ra·tion [im-yuh-rey-shuh n] /ˌɪm yəˈreɪ ʃən/, nounself-im·mure·ment, nounself-im·mur·ing, adjectiveun·im·mured, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for immurement

Historical Examples of immurement

  • Even the ordinary secret sin corrodes the heart by its immurement, and the sin of Logs house was not an ordinary one.

    The Court of Cacus

    Alexander Leighton

  • When this cell of immurement (reclusorium) was ready, the mind in Romuald was so that it scarcely could be imprisoned.

  • At the conclusion of this half century's immurement what would the world say to the Polish composer's music?

    Old Fogy

    James Huneker

  • Thenceforward Ernesta had but one thought, that of saving her daughter from that awful life of immurement and entombment.


British Dictionary definitions for immurement

immure

verb (tr)
  1. archaic, or literary to enclose within or as if within walls; imprison
  2. to shut (oneself) away from society
  3. obsolete to build into or enclose within a wall
Derived Formsimmurement, noun

Word Origin for immure

C16: from Medieval Latin immūrāre, from Latin im- (in) + mūrus a wall
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for immurement

immure

v.

1580s, from Middle French emmurer and directly from Medieval Latin immurare, literally "to shut up within walls," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (see in- (2)) + Latin murus "wall" (see mural). Related: Immured; immuring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper