Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

improvident

[im-prov-i-duh nt]
See more synonyms for improvident on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. not provident; lacking foresight; incautious; unwary.
  2. neglecting to provide for future needs.
Show More

Origin of improvident

First recorded in 1505–15; im-2 + provident
Related formsim·prov·i·dence, nounim·prov·i·dent·ly, adverb

Synonyms

See more synonyms for improvident on Thesaurus.com
1. thoughtless, careless, imprudent, heedless. 2. shiftless, thriftless, unthrifty, wasteful, prodigal.

Antonyms

1. prudent. 2. economical.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for improvidence

Historical Examples

  • Of the value of this endowment the Indian, with all his improvidence, had some notion.

    Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 20, August 1877

    Various

  • It is bohemianism in the domestic circle, a life full of improvidence and surprises.

    Artists' Wives

    Alphonse Daudet

  • What worries her most is the fatalism and improvidence of the poor.

  • Thus our improvidence is made sponsor for our disinclination.

  • Indolence and improvidence kept them down, for they were never "up."

    Alone

    Marion Harland


British Dictionary definitions for improvidence

improvident

adjective
  1. not provident; thriftless, imprudent, or prodigal
  2. heedless or incautious; rash
Show More
Derived Formsimprovidence, nounimprovidently, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for improvidence

n.

"lack of foresight, rashness," mid-15c., from Latin improvidentia, from assimilated form of in- "not" (see in- (1)) + providentia (see providence).

Show More

improvident

adj.

1510s, from im- "not" + provident. It retains a stronger connection with the "provide" aspect of Latin providere. Related: Improvidently.

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper