incarcerate

[ verb in-kahr-suh-reyt; adjective in-kahr-ser-it, -suh-reyt ]
/ verb ɪnˈkɑr səˌreɪt; adjective ɪnˈkɑr sər ɪt, -səˌreɪt /

verb (used with object), in·car·cer·at·ed, in·car·cer·at·ing.

to imprison; confine.
to enclose; constrict closely.

adjective


Nearby words

  1. incapacitated,
  2. incapacity,
  3. incapacity benefit,
  4. incaparina,
  5. incapsulate,
  6. incarcerated,
  7. incarcerated hernia,
  8. incarceration,
  9. incardinate,
  10. incardination

Origin of incarcerate

1520–30; < Medieval Latin incarcerātus past participle of incarcerāre to imprison, equivalent to in- in-2 + carcer prison + -ātus -ate1

Related formsin·car·cer·a·tion, nounin·car·cer·a·tive, adjectivein·car·cer·a·tor, nounun·in·car·cer·at·ed, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for incarcerated


British Dictionary definitions for incarcerated

incarcerate

/ (ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt) /

verb

(tr) to confine or imprison
Derived Formsincarceration, nounincarcerator, noun

Word Origin for incarcerate

C16: from Medieval Latin incarcerāre, from Latin in- ² + carcer prison

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for incarcerated

incarcerate

v.

1550s, a back-formation from incarceration, or else from Medieval Latin incarceratus, past participle of incarcerare "to imprison" (see incarceration). Related: Incarcerated; incarcerating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for incarcerated

incarcerated

[ ĭn-kärsə-rā′tĭd ]

adj.

Confined or trapped, as a hernia.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.