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inconvenient

[in-kuh n-veen-yuh nt]
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adjective
  1. not easily accessible or at hand: The phone is in an inconvenient place.
  2. inopportune; untimely: an inconvenient time for a visit.
  3. not suiting one's needs or purposes: The house has an inconvenient floor plan.
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Origin of inconvenient

1325–75; Middle English < Latin inconvenient- (stem of inconveniēns) not suiting. See in-3, convenient
Related formsin·con·ven·ient·ly, adverb

Synonyms

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3. annoying, awkward, bothersome.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for inconveniently

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • He was inconveniently poor, he was ill, and he was in exile.

    Peak and Prairie

    Anna Fuller

  • But at least she could take a few in her pocket, though it was inconveniently small.

    Susan

    Amy Walton

  • I think that I drop in upon you as inconveniently as possible, do I not?

  • Why was that scherzo on the music-desk, and why do its leaves turn so inconveniently?

  • Does it inconveniently happen that you find you're in love with her yourself?

    The Sacred Fount

    Henry James


British Dictionary definitions for inconveniently

inconvenient

adjective
  1. not convenient; troublesome, awkward, or difficult
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Derived Formsinconveniently, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for inconveniently

adv.

mid-15c., "wrongfully," from inconvenient + -ly (2). Meaning "with trouble or discomfort" is from 1650s.

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inconvenient

adj.

late 14c., "injurious, dangerous," from Old French inconvénient (13c.), from Latin inconvenientem (nominative inconveniens) "unsuitable, not accordant, dissimilar," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + convenientem (see convenient). In early 15c., "inappropriate, unbecoming, unnatural;" also, of an accused person, "unlikely as a culprit, innocent." Sense of "troublesome, awkward" first recorded 1650s.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper