invincible

[ in-vin-suh-buhl ]
/ ɪnˈvɪn sə bəl /

adjective

incapable of being conquered, defeated, or subdued.
insuperable; insurmountable: invincible difficulties.

Origin of invincible

First recorded in 1375–1425; late Middle English word from Late Latin word invincibilis. See in-3, vincible

SYNONYMS FOR invincible

1 unyielding. Invincible, impregnable, indomitable suggest that which cannot be overcome or mastered. Invincible is applied to that which cannot be conquered in combat or war, or overcome or subdued in any manner: an invincible army; invincible courage. Impregnable is applied to a place or position that cannot be taken by assault or siege, and hence to whatever is proof against attack: an impregnable fortress; impregnable virtue. Indomitable implies having an unyielding spirit, or stubborn persistence in the face of opposition or difficulty: indomitable will.

OTHER WORDS FROM invincible

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for invincibly

British Dictionary definitions for invincibly

invincible
/ (ɪnˈvɪnsəbəl) /

adjective

incapable of being defeated; unconquerable
unable to be overcome; insuperableinvincible prejudices

Derived forms of invincible

invincibility or invincibleness, nouninvincibly, adverb

Word Origin for invincible

C15: from Late Latin invincibilis, from Latin in- 1 + vincere to conquer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012