Origin of landscape

1590–1600; 1925–30 for def 6; < Dutch landschap; cognate with Old English landsceap, landscipe; akin to German Landschaft. See land, -ship
Related formsre·land·scape, verb, re·land·scaped, re·land·scap·ing.

Synonyms for landscape

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Related Words for landscaping

shrubbery, garden, setting, grounds

Examples from the Web for landscaping

Contemporary Examples of landscaping

Historical Examples of landscaping


British Dictionary definitions for landscaping

landscape

noun

an extensive area of land regarded as being visually distinctugly slagheaps dominated the landscape
a painting, drawing, photograph, etc, depicting natural scenery
  1. the genre including such pictures
  2. (as modifier)landscape painter
the distinctive features of a given area of intellectual activity, regarded as an integrated wholethe landscape of the European imagination

adjective

printing
  1. (of a publication or an illustration in a publication) of greater width than heightCompare portrait (def. 3)
  2. (of a page) carrying an illustration or table printed at right angles to the normal text

verb

(tr) to improve the natural features of (a garden, park, etc), as by creating contoured features and planting trees
(intr) to work as a landscape gardener

Word Origin for landscape

C16 landskip (originally a term in painting), from Middle Dutch lantscap region; related to Old English landscipe tract of land, Old High German lantscaf region
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for landscaping
n.

by 1861; see landscape (v.).

The question, however, is, Can landscape-gardening (or short and sweet, landscaping) be taught? It, plainly, cannot. ["The Gardener's Monthly" July 1861]

Also of artists, "depiction as a landscape" (1868).

landscape

n.

c.1600, "painting representing natural scenery," from Dutch landschap, from Middle Dutch landscap "region," from land "land" (see land) + -scap "-ship, condition" (see -ship). Originally introduced as a painters' term. Old English had cognate landscipe, and cf. Old High German lantscaf, German Landschaft, Old Norse landskapr. Meaning "tract of land with its distinguishing characteristics" is from 1886.

landscape

v.

"to lay out lawns, gardens, etc., plant trees for the sake of beautification," by 1916, from landscape (n). Related: Landscaped; landscaping.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper