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View synonyms for languid

languid

[ lang-gwid ]

adjective

  1. lacking in vigor or vitality; slack or slow:

    a languid manner.

    Synonyms: torpid, sluggish, inert, inactive

    Antonyms: energetic, active

  2. lacking in spirit or interest; listless; indifferent.

    Synonyms: spiritless

  3. drooping or flagging from weakness or fatigue; faint.

    Synonyms: exhausted, weary, feeble, weak

    Antonyms: vigorous



languid

/ ˈlæŋɡwɪd /

adjective

  1. without energy or spirit
  2. without interest or enthusiasm
  3. sluggish; inactive


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Derived Forms

  • ˈlanguidly, adverb
  • ˈlanguidness, noun
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Other Words From

  • lan·guid·ly adverb
  • lan·guid·ness noun
  • un·lan·guid adjective
  • un·lan·guid·ness noun
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Word History and Origins

Origin of languid1

First recorded in 1590–1600, languid is from the Latin word languidus “faint”; languish, -id 4
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Word History and Origins

Origin of languid1

C16: from Latin languidus, from languēre to languish
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Example Sentences

Over time, we learn about the epic heartbreak that made Spike the languid drifter he is.

From Time

Her fearlessness is the casual kind, arriving without fanfare or advertisement—languid one minute and ready to leap the next, she’s a master of the slow blink.

From Time

Happier Than Ever retains many of Eilish’s signature sounds—languid ballads, lingering, whispered syllables, dreamy synthesizer pads—while expanding outward into a disparate array of genres and eras.

From Time

When we’d hit the town after a day of languid roasting, we’d roll up as Charles Bronson and Lobsterman.

It steeps its songs in traditional Ukrainian folk music but spices them with ingredients from around the world, such as raga drones from India, metrical drumming from Japan, and languid blues from America.

All night long they struggle;  nobody knows the name  of the harsh light that keeps slowly opening  like a languid fruit.

In or out of uniform his motion is languid, his voice relaxed and mellifluous, his movements deliberate, confident.

Just a few days ago, India was in a relaxed, almost languid, state of mind.

He was more finely bred than any American she had met, with his bone-china accent, willowy height and languid wit.

Yes, there is a sense of it being still, even languid in that film.

Maria Theresa held it in her hand, and looked on it a few seconds with a languid smile.

Richard would fain have moralised and comforted, but she felt as if she knew it all before, and heard with languid attention.

Only time, he said to Mrs. Ashton—she would be all right in time; the summer heat was making her languid.

The votaries of fashion and gayety are they to whom existence grows languid and life a burden.

She raised her languid eyes to her child, but her palsied tongue could speak no word of tenderness.

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