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id

[id]
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noun Psychoanalysis.
  1. the part of the psyche, residing in the unconscious, that is the source of instinctive impulses that seek satisfaction in accordance with the pleasure principle and are modified by the ego and the superego before they are given overt expression.
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Origin of id

1920–25; < Latin id it, as a translation of German Es, special use of es it, as a psychoanalytic term

ID

[ahy-dee]
noun
  1. a means of identification, as a card or bracelet containing official or approved identification information.
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verb (used with object), ID'd or IDed or ID'ed, ID'ing or ID·ing.
  1. to identify.
  2. to issue an ID to: Go to the admissions office if you haven't been ID'd yet.
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ID

  1. Idaho (approved especially for use with zip code).
  2. Also i.d. inside diameter.
  3. intelligent design.
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-ide

or -id

  1. a suffix used in the names of chemical compounds: bromide.
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Origin of -ide

extracted from oxide

I'd

[ahyd]
  1. contraction of I would or I had.
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Usage note

id.

  1. idem.
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Id.

  1. Idaho.
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ID.

  1. (in Iraq) dinar; dinars.
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I.D.

  1. identification.
  2. identity.
  3. Military. Infantry Division.
  4. Intelligence Department.
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Origin of I.D.

First recorded in 1950–55

-id1

  1. a suffix of nouns that have the general sense “offspring of, descendant of,” occurring originally in loanwords from Greek (Atreid; Nereid), and productive in English on the Greek model, especially in names of dynasties, with the dynasty's founder as the base noun (Abbasid; Attalid), and in names of periodic meteor showers, with the base noun usually denoting the constellation or other celestial object in which the shower appears (Perseid).
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Origin of -id1

< Latin -id-, stem of -is < Greek: feminine patronymic suffix; or < Latin -idēs < Greek: masculine patronymic suffix

-id2

  1. a suffix occurring in English derivatives of modern Latin taxonomic names, especially zoological families and classes; such derivatives are usually nouns denoting a single member of the taxon or adjectives with the sense “pertaining to” the taxon: arachnid; canid.
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Origin of -id2

< Greek -idēs -id1, as singular of New Latin -ida -ida or -idae -idae

-id3

  1. variant of -ide: lipid.
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-id4

  1. a suffix occurring in descriptive adjectives borrowed from Latin, often corresponding to nouns ending in -or1: fetid; humid; pallid.
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Origin of -id4

From the Latin suffix -idus
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

psyche

Examples from the Web for id

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • And now then, Id like to have you examine more closely this pair I have here.

    Spawn of the Comet

    Harold Thompson Rich

  • Jon laid his ID tag on the desk and stepped towards the wall.

    The Velvet Glove

    Harry Harrison

  • "Id is imbossible," said van der Kuylen, shaking his great head.

    Captain Blood

    Rafael Sabatini

  • "I tell you I 'id the pipe back o' barracks," said Jakin pacifically.

  • I can write a blay, ant I can stage id, ant I can baint the scenery for id.

    Despair's Last Journey

    David Christie Murray


British Dictionary definitions for id

id1

noun
  1. psychoanal the mass of primitive instincts and energies in the unconscious mind that, modified by the ego and the superego, underlies all psychic activity
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Word Origin

C20: New Latin, from Latin: it; used to render German Es

id2

the internet domain name for
  1. Indonesia
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ID

abbreviation for
  1. Idaho
  2. identification (document)
  3. Also: i.d inside diameter
  4. Intelligence Department
  5. Also: i.d intradermal
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id.

abbreviation for
  1. idem
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Id.

abbreviation for
  1. Idaho
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I'd

contraction of
  1. I had or I would
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-id1

suffix forming nouns
  1. indicating the names of meteor showers that appear to radiate from a specified constellationOrionids (from Orion)
  2. indicating a particle, body, or structure of a specified kindenergid
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Word Origin

from Latin -id-, -is, from Greek, feminine suffix of origin

-id2

suffix forming adjectives, suffix forming nouns
  1. indicating members of a zoological familycyprinid
  2. indicating members of a dynastySeleucid; Fatimid
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Word Origin

from New Latin -idae or -ida, from Greek -idēs suffix indicating offspring

-id3

suffix forming nouns
  1. a variant of -ide
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-ide

-id

suffix forming nouns
  1. (added to the combining form of the nonmetallic or electronegative elements) indicating a binary compoundsodium chloride
  2. indicating an organic compound derived from anotheracetanilide
  3. indicating one of a class of compounds or elementspeptide; lanthanide
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Word Origin

from German -id, from French oxide oxide, based on the suffix of acide acid
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for id

n.

1924, in Joan Riviere's translation of Freud's "Das Ich und das Es" (1923), from Latin id "it" (translation of German es "it" in Freud's title), used in psychoanalytical theory to denote the unconscious instinctual force. Latin id is from PIE pronomial stem *i- (see yon).

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I.D.

also ID (but pronounced as separate letters), short for identification, attested from 1955.

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-ide

suffix used to form names of simple compounds of an element with another element or radical; originally abstracted from oxide, the first so classified.

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-id

word-forming element meaning "belonging to, connected with, member of a group or class" (plural -idae), from French -ide and directly from Latin -ides, masculine patronymic, from Greek -ides. In astronomy, of meteor showers, it represents Latin -idis, Greek -idos, the genitive of the feminine patronymic suffix.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

id in Medicine

id

(ĭd)
n.
  1. In psychoanalytic theory, the division of the psyche that is totally unconscious and serves as the source of instinctual impulses and demands for immediate satisfaction of primitive needs.
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ID

abbr.
  1. infecting dose
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-id

suff.
  1. Body; particle:chromatid.
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-ide

suff.
  1. Group of related chemical compounds:monosaccharide.
  2. Binary compound:sodium chloride.
  3. Chemical element with properties similar to another:lanthanide.
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The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

id in Science

-ide

  1. A suffix used to form the names of various chemical compounds, especially the second part of the name of a compound that has two members (such as sodium chloride) or the name of a general type of compound (such as polysaccharide).
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The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

id in Culture

id

In Freudian theory, the part of the psyche associated with instinctual, repressed, or antisocial desires, usually sexual or aggressive. In its efforts to satisfy these desires, the id comes into conflict with the social and practical constraints enforced by the ego and superego. (See also pleasure principle.)

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The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.