learned

[ lur-nid for 1–3; lurnd for 4 ]
/ ˈlɜr nɪd for 1–3; lɜrnd for 4 /

adjective

having much knowledge; scholarly; erudite: learned professors.
connected or involved with the pursuit of knowledge, especially of a scholarly nature: a learned journal.
of or showing learning or knowledge; well-informed: learned in the ways of the world.
acquired by experience, study, etc.: learned behavior.

Nearby words

  1. learn,
  2. learn by heart,
  3. learn one's lesson,
  4. learn to live with,
  5. learnable,
  6. learned borrowing,
  7. learned drive,
  8. learned helplessness,
  9. learned profession,
  10. learned society

Origin of learned

First recorded in 1300–50, learned is from the Middle English word lerned. See learn, -ed2

Related forms

learn

[ lurn ]
/ lɜrn /

verb (used with object), learned [lurnd] /lɜrnd/ or learnt, learn·ing.

verb (used without object), learned [lurnd] /lɜrnd/ or learnt, learn·ing.

to acquire knowledge or skill: to learn rapidly.
to become informed (usually followed by of): to learn of an accident.

Origin of learn

before 900; Middle English lernen, Old English leornian to learn, read, ponder (cognate with German lernen); akin to lesan to glean (cognate with German lesen to read). See lear

Related formslearn·a·ble, adjectivemis·learn, verb, mis·learned or mis·learnt, mis·learn·ing.out·learn, verb (used with object), out·learned or out·learnt, out·learn·ing.re·learn, verb, re·learned or re·learnt, re·learn·ing.

Can be confusedlearn teach

Synonym study

1. Learn, ascertain, detect, discover imply adding to one's store of facts. To learn is to add to one's knowledge or information: to learn a language. To ascertain is to verify facts by inquiry or analysis: to ascertain the truth about an event. To detect implies becoming aware of something that had been obscure, secret, or concealed: to detect a flaw in reasoning. To discover is used with objective clauses as a synonym of learn in order to suggest that the new information acquired is surprising to the learner: I discovered that she had been married before.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for learned


British Dictionary definitions for learned

learned

/ (ˈlɜːnɪd) /

adjective

having great knowledge or erudition
involving or characterized by scholarship
(prenominal) a title applied in referring to a member of the legal profession, esp to a barristermy learned friend
Derived Formslearnedly, adverblearnedness, noun

learn

/ (lɜːn) /

verb learns, learning, learned (lɜːnd) or learnt

(when tr, may take a clause as object) to gain knowledge of (something) or acquire skill in (some art or practice)
(tr) to commit to memory
(tr) to gain by experience, example, etc
(intr; often foll by of or about) to become informed; know
not standard to teach
Derived Formslearnable, adjective

Word Origin for learn

Old English leornian; related to Old High German lirnen

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for learned
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with learned

learn

In addition to the idioms beginning with learn

  • learn by heart
  • learn one's lesson
  • learn to live with

also see:

  • by heart, learn
  • little knowledge (learning) is a dangerous thing
  • live and learn
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.