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legitim

[ lej-i-tim ]
/ ˈlɛdʒ ɪ tɪm /
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noun Roman and Civil Law, Scots Law.
the part of an estate that children or other close relatives can claim against the decedent's testament.
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QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!
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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.
Also le·git·i·me [li-jit-uh-mee]. /lɪˈdʒɪt əˌmi/.

Origin of legitim

1350–1400; Middle English <Latin lēgitima (pars) the lawful (part), equivalent to lēgi- (stem of lēx law) + -tima, feminine of -timus adj. suffix
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use legitim in a sentence

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