leopard

[ lep-erd ]
/ ˈlɛp ərd /

noun

a large, spotted Asian or African carnivore, Panthera pardus, of the cat family, usually tawny with black markings; the Old World panther: all leopard populations are threatened or endangered.
the fur or pelt of this animal.
any of various related cats resembling this animal.
Heraldry. a lion represented from the side as walking, usually with one forepaw raised, and looking toward the spectator.
Numismatics.
  1. an Anglo-Gallic gold coin issued by Edward III, equal to half a florin, bearing the figure of a leopard.
  2. a silver Anglo-Gallic coin issued by Henry V.
(initial capital letter) Military. a 42-ton (38-metric ton) West German tank with a 105mm gun.

Origin of leopard

1250–1300; Middle English < Late Latin leōpardus < Greek leópardos, syncopated variant of leontópardos, equivalent to leonto- (stem of léōn) lion + párdos pard1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

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British Dictionary definitions for leopard

leopard
/ (ˈlɛpəd) /

noun

Also called: panther a large feline mammal, Panthera pardus, of forests of Africa and Asia, usually having a tawny yellow coat with black rosette-like spots
any of several similar felines, such as the snow leopard and cheetah
clouded leopard a feline, Neofelis nebulosa, of SE Asia and Indonesia with a yellowish-brown coat marked with darker spots and blotches
heraldry a stylized leopard, painted as a lion with the face turned towards the front
the pelt of a leopard

Derived forms of leopard

leopardess, fem n

Word Origin for leopard

C13: from Old French lepart, from Late Latin leōpardus, from Late Greek leópardos, from leōn lion + pardos pard ² (the leopard was thought at one time to be the result of cross-breeding)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012