let go


1

Allow to escape, set free, as in The police decided to let him go. [c. 1300]

2

Also, let go of. Release one's hold on, as in Please let go of my sleeve, or Once he starts on this subject, he never lets go. [Early 1400s]

3

let it go. Allow it to stand or be accepted. For example, Let it go; we needn't discuss it further. This usage is sometimes amplified to let it go at that, meaning “allow matters to stand as they are.” [Late 1800s]

4

Cease to employ, dismiss, as in They had to let 20 workers go.

5

Also, let oneself go. Behave without restraint, abandon one's inhibitions; also, neglect one's personal hygiene and appearance. For example, When the music began, Jean let herself go and started a wild dance, or After her husband's death she let herself go, forgetting to bathe and staying in her nightgown all day. The first sense dates from the late 1800s, the second from the early 1900s.

QUIZZES

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Did you ever collect all those state quarters? Put them to good use on this quiz about curious state monikers and the facts around them.
Question 1 of 8
Mississippi’s nickname comes from the magnificent trees that grow there. What is it?
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Example sentences from the Web for let go

  • We agree that each Holder of so many acres shall pay one penny yearly, and let-go the eels as too slippery.

    Past and Present|Thomas Carlyle