lex

[ leks ]
/ lɛks /

noun, plural le·ges [lee-jeez; Latin le-ges] /ˈli dʒiz; Latin ˈlɛ gɛs/.

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Question 1 of 7
weal

Origin of lex

First recorded in 1490–1500, lex is from the Latin word lēx

Definition for lex (2 of 3)

Definition for lex (3 of 3)

salus populi suprema lex esto
[ sah-loo s paw-poo-lee soo-prey-mah leks es-toh; English sey-luh s pop-yuh-lahy-soo-pree-muh leks es-toh ]
/ ˈsɑ lʊs ˈpɔ pʊˌli suˈpreɪ mɑ lɛks ˈɛs toʊ; English ˈseɪ ləs ˈpɒp yəˌlaɪ sʊˈpri mə lɛks ˈɛs toʊ /

Latin.

let the welfare of the people be the supreme law: a motto of Missouri.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for lex

British Dictionary definitions for lex

lex
/ (lɛks) /

noun plural leges (ˈliːdʒiːz)

a system or body of laws
a particular specified law

Word Origin for lex

Latin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012