lough

[ lok, lokh ]

nounIrish English.
  1. a lake.

  2. a partially landlocked or protected bay; a narrow arm of the sea.

Origin of lough

1
1505–15; Anglo-Irish spelling of Irish loch lake; compare Middle English low, lough(e), logh(e), Old English (Northumbrian) lūh<British Celtic *lux- (>Welsh llwch (obsolete) lake, Old Breton luh,Breton louc’h), apparently <early Irish; see loch

Words Nearby lough

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How to use lough in a sentence

  • Winterfell is in fact Castle Ward, which may be more familiar as Winterfell, overlooks the beautiful Strangford lough.

    Queen To Visit Westeros | Tom Sykes | June 20, 2014 | THE DAILY BEAST
  • Cattle and kine were taken furtively or openly to these very hills and vales where Jim lough now lived in quietude and peace.

    David Lannarck, Midget | George S. Harney
  • Those who had passed on told only fragments, and Jim lough, neither verified nor denied.

    David Lannarck, Midget | George S. Harney
  • In these things, Jim lough made enemies as well as friends, but cared as little for the one as he appreciated the other.

    David Lannarck, Midget | George S. Harney
  • If anyone calls me Miss lough, I pay no attention, thinking they mean someone else.

    David Lannarck, Midget | George S. Harney
  • Hearing the outcry, Adine lough came out of the house, and down the graveled way.

    David Lannarck, Midget | George S. Harney

British Dictionary definitions for lough

lough

/ (lɒx, lɒk) /


noun
  1. an Irish word for lake 1

  2. a long narrow bay or arm of the sea in Ireland

Origin of lough

1
C14: from Irish loch lake

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012