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lout

1
[lout]
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noun
  1. an awkward, stupid person; clumsy, ill-mannered boor; oaf.
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verb (used with object)
  1. to flout; treat with contempt; scorn.
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Origin of lout

1
First recorded in 1540–50; perhaps special use of lout2

lout

2
[lout]
verb (used with or without object)
  1. to bend, stoop, or bow, especially in respect or courtesy.
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Origin of lout

2
1250–1300; Middle English louten, Old English lūtan; cognate with Old Norse lūta; akin to little
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for louting

jeer, ridicule, insult, torment, deride, offend, mock, disdain, taunt, scoff, scorn, disparage, scout, revile, affront, tantalize, lout, bother, dig, sneer

Examples from the Web for louting

Historical Examples of louting

  • And now, turning to Yolande, he bared his head, louting full low.

    The Geste of Duke Jocelyn

    Jeffery Farnol

  • Further, his head was louting low on his neck, so that the visitor got no view sufficient for recognition.

    Average Jones

    Samuel Hopkins Adams

  • At the unearthly sound, the cattle also commenced a louting that might easily have been heard at two or three miles off.


British Dictionary definitions for louting

lout

1
noun
  1. a crude or oafish person; boor
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Word Origin for lout

C16: perhaps from lout ²

lout

2
verb
  1. (intr) archaic to bow or stoop
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Word Origin for lout

Old English lūtan; related to Old Norse lūta
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for louting

lout

n.

1540s, "awkward fellow, clown, bumpkin," perhaps from a dialectal survival of Middle English louten (v.) "bow down" (c.1300), from Old English lutan "bow low," from Proto-Germanic *lut- "to bow, bend, stoop" (cf. Old Norse lutr "stooping," which might also be the source of the modern English word), from PIE *leud- "to lurk" (cf. Gothic luton "to deceive," Old English lot "deceit), also "to be small" (see little). Non-Germanic cognates probably include Lithuanian liudeti "to mourn;" Old Church Slavonic luditi "to deceive," ludu "foolish." Sense of "cad" is first attested 1857 in British schoolboy slang.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper