lupin

US lupine

noun
  1. any leguminous plant of the genus Lupinus, of North America, Europe, and Africa, with large spikes of brightly coloured flowers and flattened pods

Word Origin for lupin

C14: from Latin lupīnus wolfish (see lupine); from the belief that the plant ravenously exhausted the soil
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Examples from the Web for lupin

Historical Examples of lupin

  • This is the lure of wild nature between the lupin and the laurel.

    Days Off

    Henry Van Dyke

  • "Tell him to prove it," was Lupin's rejoinder to the journalists.

    The Blonde Lady

    Maurice Leblanc

  • Was a confederate of Lupin's, like the workmen who flung that bag at our heads.

    The Blonde Lady

    Maurice Leblanc

  • Lupin, if you don't stop this minute, this second, I fire at mademoiselle!

    The Blonde Lady

    Maurice Leblanc

  • Lupin had not exaggerated when saying that they would go "pretty fast."

    The Blonde Lady

    Maurice Leblanc


Word Origin and History for lupin
n.

plant of the genus lupinus, late 14c., from Latin lupinus, name of the plant, noun use of an adjective meaning "of a wolf" (see lupine). The reason for association with the animal is unclear; perhaps it was so called because of a belief that the plants were harmful to soil (cf. lupus).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper