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lurid

[ loor-id ]
/ ˈlʊər ɪd /
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adjective
gruesome; horrible; revolting: the lurid details of an accident.
glaringly vivid or sensational; shocking: the lurid tales of pulp magazines.
terrible in intensity, fierce passion, or unrestraint: lurid crimes.
lighted or shining with an unnatural, fiery glow; wildly or garishly red: a lurid sunset.
wan, pallid, or ghastly in hue; livid.
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Origin of lurid

First recorded in 1650–60, lurid is from the Latin word lūridus sallow, ghastly

OTHER WORDS FROM lurid

lu·rid·ly, adverblu·rid·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use lurid in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for lurid

lurid
/ (ˈlʊərɪd, ˈljʊərɪd) /

adjective
vivid in shocking detail; sensational
horrible in savagery or violence
pallid in colour; wan
glowing with an unnatural glare

Derived forms of lurid

luridly, adverbluridness, noun

Word Origin for lurid

C17: from Latin lūridus pale yellow; probably related to lūtum a yellow vegetable dye
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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